Wheels Up’s SPAC reveals revenue, profitability, membership, fleet size and more

Wheels Up

Wheels Up ended 2020 with 10,995 active members and $690 million in revenues. It’s forecast to reach $912 million this year

Will Wheels Up be the first private jet company with its own co-branded credit card?

The private aviation company sees a future for the Wheels Up brand in luxury lodging, yachts, and experiences to credit cards and financial services

Wheels Up is going public via a SPAC. It’s provides a rare look into the world of private jet companies, which are either privately held or subsidiaries of large publicly traded companies, with limited public data.

Wheels Up waives membership fees for JetSuite jet card customers

Wheels Up Meals Up

SuiteKey members save the normal $17,500 joining and membership fee

Wheels Up is offering customers of now grounded JetSuite the ability to fly in its membership program waiving the $17,500 joining and initiation fees.

Wheels Up unveils major program enhancements

Wheels Up

Wheels Up becomes the first major jet card provider to offer four guaranteed availability jet cabin categories and a turboprop program on a national basis

What a difference a year makes. At this time last year, rumors were swirling. Wheels Up was expanding beyond its core King Air 350i and Citation Excel fleet with an off-fleet light jet program.

The new programs, effective January 2nd, will offer dynamic trip pricing with capped hourly rates and guaranteed availability nationwide. They will run across five cabin categories, from its King Air 350i fleet to light, midsize, super-midsize, and large jets.

Jet Card Insider: Wheels Up is no longer a two-trick pony

Wheels up Citation X

After bringing turboprops mainstream by championing the King Air 350i, Wheels Up is now filling out its product offerings

There are probably few privately held companies that get as much airtime on the business cable networks as Kenny Dichter and Wheels Up, his entry second entry into the world of jet cards. His debut in 2001 was an exclusive agreement with NetJets to sell jet cards onto its fractionally owned fleet. Instead of having to buy at least 50 hours per year with a five-year commitment, Marquis Jet Partners offered the opportunity to buy in 25 hours at a time.

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