General Aviation Leaders Say More Than $1.5 Billion In Damages At Stake; Ask DOT to Reopen FAA Aircraft Registry

The private aviation industry is reacting to expected damages from the alternately named Schumer and Trump Shutdown which is closing large parts of the U.S. government

 

Following up on a plea by National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) CEO Ed Bolen outlining the economic damage to business aviation and the economy from the government shutdown, six leaders in general aviation (GA) today sent a letter to Department of Transportation (DOT) Secretary Elaine Chao calling for reopening the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA’s) United States Aircraft Registry. The NBAA and fellow GA groups argued that the U.S. Registry performs essential functions for safety, security and fulfilling international aviation treaties. A copy of the full letter in its entirety is at the end of this post.

National Business Aviation Association Warns Government Shutdown Will Impact Private Jet Travel

Private aviation may feel the impact of a continued government shutdown NBAA CEO Ed Bolen said in a statement

 

National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) President and CEO Ed Bolen on Friday warned Washington policymakers that the government shutdown could have serious repercussions for a vital American industry: general aviation. 

No Plane, No Gain: Keeping Track Of Private Jet Productivity

Jet Cards are popular with companies that want to obtain the benefits of private aviation and be able to carefully budget total spending and costs per trip.

 

It might surprise you that it is estimated around 50% of Jet Card flying is for business. While Jet Cards are popular with families and executives who fly by company jet, but need a personal private travel solution, the Jet Card is also ideal for companies. Many Jet Cards provide guaranteed hourly rates, and one-way rates, meaning no ferry fees. Both features mean that it is easier to budget trips. Jet Cards also provide the ability to quickly take advantage of opportunities that pop up without having to worry about transferring funds, but because they are purchased in fix amounts, give your CFO and COO budget control. 

The Survey Says Successful Companies Use Private Jets

New research shows that companies that use private aviation sell more, earn more and have happier and more productive employees

 

Business aviation is a productivity tool used by thousands of companies and organizations of all sizes. These forward-thinking organizations utilize business aircraft to minimize travel time; enhance the efficiency, productivity, safety and security of key personnel; and remain nimble, competitive and successful in today’s highly competitive marketplace, so says new research. It’s time to separate fact from fiction. 

NBAA Report: New Aircraft Sales Struggle As Private Jet Charter Surges

Private jet charter including jet cards and jet membership programs are a bright spot in business aviation

Honeywell has released its 26th annual Business Aviation Outlook and it projects 8,300 new private jets will be delivered over the next 10 years at a value of $249 billion. It’s an interesting comparison to its pre-Recession forecast in 2007 which called for 14,000 net private jets to be delivered over the past decade worth $233 billion. 

What Questions Should I Ask Before Chartering A Private Jet?

Chartering a private jet is much more than getting quotes for the hourly rate

 

Not all private aviation operators are the same. Before you charter a private aircraft, the National Business Aviation Association suggests you ask these questions. Keep in mind that one advantage of jet cards is your provider has set specific sourcing standards, so you only have to go through this once as opposed to every trip or each time there is a switch in the operator. You can compare over 100 jet cards by 65 variables by becoming a subscriber to Private Jet Card Comparisons. There’s more information here. Before chartering a private jet, the questions below will help you find an operator that you are comfortable with. 

New Study: Companies Using Private Jets Outperform Non-Users

NEXA Advisors found over five years companies that use business aviation beat non-users in sales growth, profit, employee satisfaction and accolades

 

Dear John Flannery and General Electric. Hold onto those private jets! A new study released today covering S&P 500 companies shows those that closed their flight departments experienced less financial success, compared to those that continued to utilize business aviation, even during economic downturns. Over a five-year period, users of business aircraft grew their top line by a factor of 2.4 more than non-users on a weighted and indexed basis. Further, private jet users out-performed non-users by 23 percent in revenue growth and users out-performed non-users by 18 percent in market capitalization.