Forget the price. Here’s what you need to ask before your next private air charter

Private jet charter safety

Before chartering a private jet, turboprop or piston aircraft, here are the questions you should ask the operator

The National Business Aviation Association’s Aircraft Charter Consumer guide offers the questions you should ask of a charter operator before you buy, and certainly before you fly.

Deadly Charter Flights: An industry group is expressing concern about illegal charters a week after a troubling report on a 2017 Learjet crash

Private jet charter safety

Football star Emiliano Sala’s death when the Piper Malibu he was flying crashed is raising safety issues days after a report cited pilot qualifications in a 2017 Learjet crash in the U.S.

A letter sent today by BACA, The Air Charter Association (of Europe), to its members is highlighting safety concerns in the sometimes murky world of private jet charter, which includes piston and turboprop aircraft in addition to jets.

This comes days after the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said both pilots in the May 15, 2017 crash of a Learjet 35A during its approach to Teterboro Airport in New Jersey failed to follow company standard operating procedures. Both pilots died and there were no passengers onboard.

Teterboro crash pilot not qualified

After the death of Sala, here are the questions you should ask about your private charter pilots

Private Jet Safety

The crash that killed European soccer star Emiliano Sala and lack of regulation for brokers is putting qualifications of private jet pilots in the spotlight

As reports started to surface that the pilot who flew the doomed flight of soccer star Emiliano Sala might not have been qualified, it made me wonder, how can this happen? Here’s a professional athlete making millions of dollars on a private charter being flown at night, in poor conditions, by somebody who may not have had the experience needed for that trip, on an aircraft that was probably not ideal for that time and place.

Explaining the differences between broker, fractional fleet, managed fleet and owned fleet jet cards

There are over 40 jet card providers offering more than 250 programs, and there are some significant differences and not just in price

 

In this article, I want to explain the differences in how aircraft for various jet card programs are sourced. Of the subscribers to Private Jet Card Comparisons, I estimate about 75% are flying via on-demand charter, but after getting tired of the work it takes for each trip to compare quotes, quality of providers and varying charter terms, they are seeking an easier solution but don’t necessarily want the long-term commitment of leases and fractional shares, hence jet cards. The benefit of jet card programs is once you choose the right program, arranging your flight is generally one phone call or can even be handled online or through an app. Of course, finding the right provider and program takes a bit of work. We’ve identified over 65 places that the card programs vary, which depending on your flying needs can be critical or incidental. 

Questions to ask when buying a jet card

The HondaJet cabin measures 222 cubic feet

The number of jet card programs has more than doubled in the past decade means more choices for you. Before you buy, here are some of the questions to ask

 

With jet card programs that staring at just five hours as well as cards for 100 hours of flight time, an area that used to be reserved for fractional ownership, there is more choice than ever. Some programs don’t even require you to buy hours in advance, although they may have a nonrefundable membership fee. We’ve identified 65 variables that can influence which program is best for you.