Jet Linx grounds its fleet…for a Safety Summit

Jet Linx

The 3rd annual event brings together the private jet management and jet card provider’s over 500 employees to focus on safety

Jet Linx Aviation is grounding its fleet of over 100 private jets for a day once again as part of its third annual safety summit. By dedicating the entire day to advancing its rigorous safety standards the Omaha-based business aviation operator looks to highlight its focus on the subject.

The company claims to be the only air carrier in the United States to voluntarily halt operations for this type of event. The focus of the Safety Summit this year is safety culture, safety management, and how to identify potential hazards.  The day includes a special keynote session from Jim Hall, former National Transportation Safety Board chairman, on organizational contributing factors in aviation safety.

XOJET on safety, privacy, and how you can avoid bad weather flying

XOJET

Private Jet Card Comparisons recently talked with XOJET Aviation’s director of safety, Dan Ramirez

XOJET Aviation is a Wyvern Wingman, Argus Platinum, IS-BAO Stage 3 operator with a fleet of 43 Citation Xs and Challenger 300s. It has one of the largest owned fleets in the U.S.

While flying privately remains safe, illegal charters, including an accident that killed a European soccer star, and new entrants, with convoluted offerings, have clouded the horizon.

Recently we talked to Dan Ramirez, director of aviation for XOJET Aviation to talk about its approach, and for tips on both safety and privacy.

Forget the price. Here’s what you need to ask before your next private air charter

Private jet charter safety

Before chartering a private jet, turboprop or piston aircraft, here are the questions you should ask the operator

The National Business Aviation Association’s Aircraft Charter Consumer guide offers the questions you should ask of a charter operator before you buy, and certainly before you fly.

Deadly Charter Flights: An industry group is expressing concern about illegal charters a week after a troubling report on a 2017 Learjet crash

Private jet charter safety

Football star Emiliano Sala’s death when the Piper Malibu he was flying crashed is raising safety issues days after a report cited pilot qualifications in a 2017 Learjet crash in the U.S.

A letter sent today by BACA, The Air Charter Association (of Europe), to its members is highlighting safety concerns in the sometimes murky world of private jet charter, which includes piston and turboprop aircraft in addition to jets.

This comes days after the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said both pilots in the May 15, 2017 crash of a Learjet 35A during its approach to Teterboro Airport in New Jersey failed to follow company standard operating procedures. Both pilots died and there were no passengers onboard.

Teterboro crash pilot not qualified

After the death of Sala, here are the questions you should ask about your private charter pilots

Private Jet Safety

The crash that killed European soccer star Emiliano Sala and lack of regulation for brokers is putting qualifications of private jet pilots in the spotlight

As reports started to surface that the pilot who flew the doomed flight of soccer star Emiliano Sala might not have been qualified, it made me wonder, how can this happen? Here’s a professional athlete making millions of dollars on a private charter being flown at night, in poor conditions, by somebody who may not have had the experience needed for that trip, on an aircraft that was probably not ideal for that time and place.