Facing mounting lawsuits, JetSmarter fires back, says litigation represents “less than 0.1% of growing customer base”

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Against the backdrop of three more lawsuits, the sharing economy private jet company is responding, saying programs changes were within its rights, and the “vast majority” of “core” members are understanding

 

Over the past two weeks, at least three more lawsuits have been filed against JetSmarter, including two customers who say shortly after spending $97,500 upfront for discounted multi-year memberships they found themselves without the benefits they paid for. The lawsuits filed in New Jersey, Illinois and New York each allege shortly after joining or renewing key benefits they were promised were no longer available. With the mounting lawsuits, in general, they detail a series of back and forth communications with JetSmarter employees as benefits were being changed, and after failing to receive a refund or satisfactory solution, in each case, the members decided to take JetSmarter to court.

“Scam” JetSmarter” hit by another lawsuit seeking at least $2.2 million in damages

A “senior” couple say they were “scammed” by JetSmarter for $30,000 weeks before the company started cutting back on its scheduled flights with the free seats they were expecting

 

With each lawsuit – this is at least the seventh Private Jet Card Comparisons has tracked – the stories about JetSmarter’s sales tactics get more troubling. Even as management was pivoting its model of paid annual memberships in return for the ability to book free seats on scheduled private jet shuttles, its sales team was continuing “high-pressure” tactics trying to push even more expensive memberships while telling the media that it was focusing on more accessible pricing.

JetSmarter plans expansion despite new lawsuits, including from one customer who paid $87,500

JetSmarter

The latest lawsuits bring to at least five the number of actions alleging fraud against the Ft. Lauderdale-based sharing economy private jet membership service

 

As a lawsuit seeking at least $2 million against it continues with a hearing scheduled for early December in Los Angeles, JetSmarter has been hit with two more lawsuits. The first one was filed October 16th in The United States District Court For The Eastern District Of Wisconsin, at least the fourth since August, and accuses the Fort Lauderdale-based sharing economy private jet service with breach of contract, breach of good faith and fraudulent representation. The lawsuit seeks at least $75,000 in compensatory damages, undisclosed punitive damages, attorney’s fees and other relief that the court deems proper. In another lawsuit, filed today in the Southern District of Florida, Illinois-based Joann Bachewicz is seeking at least $300,0000 after she paid $87,500 for a three-year membership JetSmarter represented as having a $150,000 value. 

Lawsuits, layoffs, safety concerns, and now lack of flights cloud JetSmarter’s future

JetSmarter XOJET Vista Global Vistajet

An in-depth look beyond JetSmarter’s legal woes, layoffs and last week’s safety incident to its actual flight schedules and how much you will end up paying for both single seats and to start shared flights

 

 

With a new lawsuit seeking at least $890,000 filed against JetSmarter last week in New Jersey and perhaps a dozen more customers contemplating legal action, Private Jet Card Comparisons has been told by multiple sources that as many as 40 people were laid off from the company over the past several weeks. In March 2017, its CEO Sergey Petrossov told the Miami Herald it had 260 employees. 

Kim Kardashian and Petra Nemcova are part of a new $2 million lawsuit against JetSmarter

Private jet safety

The lawsuit, the second since last Friday, was filed earlier this week in California after JetSmarter refused to renew the plaintiff’s membership. It seeks to have the private jet-sharing provider live up to the promises it allegedly made and reneged on to members

 

A day before his auto-renew membership should have been extended earlier this year and nearly a month after his opt-out date, Derek Milosavljevic received a notification from JetSmarter it wouldn’t allow him to renew him for a third year. His lawyer says the only explanation he was given about why he couldn’t continue was, “It was a management decision,” although he believes it could have been retaliation for a “negative but truthful” review he posted on Yelp in June 2017. His lawyer, Darin T. Beffa, noted that in not allowing his client to renew, JetSmarter violated its own and ever-changing terms, which he says required a notice period of 30 days by the member, and that is the point of the 57-page lawsuit with 70 more pages of attachments, including Instagram posts from Kim Kardashian and Petra Nemcova. 

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