The Jets Dot Com membership eliminates the 7.5% Federal Excise Tax from its inclusive pricing

Unused hours are refundable

The latest COVID-19 Coronavirus response to last-minute flying needs spurred by the pandemic is from jet card broker Jets.com.

Access to its fixed-rate, guaranteed availability no-fee membership now starts at 10 hours. The program is also refundable for unused hours.

Like other programs with one-way fixed rates, Jets.com offers protection against surge pricing. It also means you don’t have to pay repositioning fees.

It offers guaranteed availability of 24 hours on non-peak days and 96 hours on 27 peak days providing short-notice access.

Jet Card pricing

Rates now start at $4,930 per hour on a light jet. Midsize aircraft are $6,055 per hour, while it’s $7,090 for super-midsize and $10,080 per hour on large-cabin aircraft.

Jets.com jet card pricing
Jets.com has launched a 10-hour jet card through the end of 2020. For all its programs, the new inclusive rates eliminate the 7.5% Federal Excise Tax.

There’s no taxi time, but there is a 90-minute daily minimum across the board. That’s higher than some for those of you who do sub-60-minute segments. It’s also attractive for super-midsize and heavy jet fliers.

While demand currently has plummeted, supply beyond the near term is also likely to fall.

Of 573 private Part 135 operators which fly business jets, 71% have five or fewer jets in their fleet. Privately flying is currently down more than 60%. With no light at the end of the tunnel, some of the fleets are being mothballed. Pilots are being furloughed, making sourcing aircraft more time-consuming.

Jet card membership continues to be an excellent emergency preparedness tool. Jet memberships enable you to move family members and business associates on short notice with pre-set pricing.

Another benefit of Jets.com jet cards, like many others, is guaranteed replacement in case of non-weather related delays.

When booking an on-demand charter, the customer is usually responsible for any additional charges for a new aircraft. If you booked directly with an operator, you would likely need to pay the new provider. That’s while you wait for a refund.

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