Vista Global’s XO is now offering empty legs to non-members

After the June merger of JetSmarter and XOJET, the new FlyXO.com has been tweaking the jet sharing part of its offering

Vista Global is continuing to put its stamp on its XO brand since merging JetSmarter and XOJET at the beginning of the summer. First, it added JetSmarter’s jet sharing functionality to the former XOJET dynamic jet card pricing memberships.

The move meant that XO Select and Signature memberships could all of a sudden share seats on flights they had booked with their deposits. Elite members who get fixed rates can’t share seats on those flights, but otherwise, get all the perks a JetSmarter member received.

XO also tweaked Select Access and non-member options. In essence, there are two versions of Select Access. But the big news is non-members can now book seats on at least some empty legs.

Private charter platform PrivateFly, a Directional Aviation company, has appointed Gregg Slow as president for the Americas

The former C-Suite executive with XOJET recently left as acquirer Vista Global merged it with the former JetSmarter

Business aviation veteran Gregg Slow has joined PrivateFly’s senior leadership team to head the U.S. division of the company, which operates from a U.S. headquarters in Boston and a sales office in Fort Lauderdale, with further sales teams based across the country.

The U.S. now accounts for half of PrivateFly’s global flight sales for the U.K.-based provider, according to the press announcement.

Slow brings 19 years of business aviation experience to the newly created role, most recently from his seven-year tenure at XOJET where, as chief client officer, he built the commercial client-facing offering and assisted in the company’s acquisition by Vista Global. Earlier this summer the VistaJet parent merged XOJET and JetSmarter to form XO.

Vista Global appoints new top executives at XO; XOJET Aviation, XO relocate to East Coast

The moves follow the merger of XOJET and JetSmarter earlier this summer

Two former top executives are exiting XO, formerly XOJET, following its recent combination with JetSmarter. Gregg Slow, president of enterprise at XO has left while James Henderson, president of commercial operations will join Exclusive Resorts LLC as CEO in October it was announced last week.

Arbitrator approves $6 million JetSmarter Class Arbitration Settlement; Court date to confirm settlement scheduled

A dozen lawsuits brought by unhappy members have recently been referred to arbitration in separate actions

Ellen Leesfield, the arbitrator overseeing the class action settlement between JetSmarter and its members, approved the agreement on July 11, 2019. The next step will take place on Aug. 22 when a judge in Miami-Dade County will need to decide whether or not to confirm the arbitrator’s decision.

In her ruling, Leesfield, a former judge, overruled several objections writing, “Plaintiffs and the class faced a multitude of serious, substantive defenses, any one of which could have precluded or drastically reduced prospects of recovery.” She also noted JetSmarter has “consistently denied liability and indicated an intention to vigorously pursue its potential defenses.”

JetSmarter

As of June 27, settlement administrators received 1,567 claim forms and 101 requests for exclusion. Previous reports had indicated close to 12,000 current or former members of the jet sharing service could be eligible.

Cash payments are expected to range between $250 and $21,000 with nearly $3 million to be split between the class and a similar amount going to the lawyers who represented the plaintiffs.

Buying a jet card? Remember, there are options for cabin size or picking a specific aircraft type

Will any light jet do, or would it be better to have a specific type such as the Embraer Phenom 300?

While there are many variables that separate the over 300 jet cards in the Private Jet Card Comparisons database – over 65 in fact, one difference means a lot to some people and nothing to others.

However, for both types of buyers, choosing the wrong type of program can make for a less than enjoyable experience despite the provider’s overall merits. Figuring it out before you sign can both save you money and make sure the program fits your mission needs.

There are essentially two ways that available aircraft are structured for fixed-rate (and usually guaranteed availability) programs by jet card providers.

One is by cabin-class or size. When buying into a cabin class you are assured of getting an aircraft in that class or larger if you are lucky enough be upgraded based on operational needs.

The other is by specific aircraft make or type, for example, you are buying into an Embraer Phenom 300. So while the provider may let you fly in other types, you know when you want a Phenom 300, you’re going to get a Phenom 300 and not some other type of light jet.