Victor is launching Alto – a frequent flyer program for on-demand private jet charter customers

Alto is the new points-based frequent flyer program targeting private jet fliers who use Victor’s on-demand brokerage. We give you our evaluation – Is it worth it?

 

First, among major airlines, there was American Airlines and its AAdvantage Frequent Flier program back in 1981. Its compelling proposition of free flights to Hawaii made it an instant hit. Within months came everyone else. In the world of jet cards and fractional ownership, there have long been referral programs. Refer a friend (or enemy) and earn free flight hours, which with hourly rates of up to $10,000 or more, can be well, valuable. When buying cards, you can also try to wrangle an extra hour when you are signing. For on-demand charter, it has been mainly a trip to the Grand Bazaar with each journey a new opportunity to hone your skills and ask your broker, “Are you sure you can’t do a bit better?” Yesterday, U.K.-based charter broker Victor said it had launched its own frequent flier program hoping to develop loyalty with rightfully fickle on-demand charter customers who are conditioned to shop for a deal. 

Five safety questions to ask private jet charter operators before you buy

While many searches for private air charter start with ‘how much does a jet cost?’ or some derivative about pricing and hourly rate, jet card and charter operator XOJET outlines some key safety questions to ask

 

The following was published on XOJET’s blog and is reprinted with the company’s permission:

The key to finding a great private aviation provider is knowing their number-one priority is the same as yours: for every flight to be as safe and secure as scientifically possible. To confirm that to be true, says Dan Ramirez, XOJET’s Director of Safety, customers should ask private aviation companies five simple safety questions before considering flying with them. “Every staff member of credible, safety-first organizations,” he explains, “will be happy to answer those questions in detail.” 

Fly Private Friday – We showcase some of the luckiest dogs around as they enjoy the private jet experience

When you buy a jet card your happiest friend may be your best friend. In this edition of #FlyPrivateFriday we scan social media to showcase another good reason to #FlyPrivate – your dog will love you for it!

 

Before we showcase some lucky dogs, remember, before you buy a jet card subscribe to Private Jet Card Comparisons to compare the pet travel policies for over 250 jet card programs. OK, now onto the cute dogs! 

Private Jet Card Comparisons selects “Best Jet Cards For Summer Travel”

If you want to get the most out of your summer vacation travel but aren’t ready to spend $100,000 or more on a jet card, check out these programs that won’t break the bank

 

Airline delays can easily ruin those quick summer getaways, however, having a private jet at one’s disposal can make those weekend trips a pleasure. For flights under two hours, flying privately can cut travel by more than half, and while popular jet card membership programs typically start at $100,000 and can cost over $1 millionPrivate Jet Card Comparisons has identified jet cards that will let travelers take flight without breaking the bank, starting at under $10,000.

Wheels Up confirms possible IPO; Citation X pricing imminent

In 2017, Wheels Up continued its prolific fundraising. In 2018 it’s expanding its reach with a Citation X fleet. Now it confirms an IPO may be on the way.

 

Kenny Dichter, the founder and CEO of Wheels Up, has carved a preeminent spot for himself in the world of business aviation. In 2001 he approached then NetJets Chairman and CEO Richard Santulli with the idea he would buy shares in aircraft from the Warren Buffett owned fractional aircraft operator and then resell them in 25-hour chunks as jet cards. At the time, there was just a handful of players in that young jet card segment. Fractional shares start at 50 hours, so the idea was that Marquis Jet Partners would act as an entry point funneling customers to NetJets as their private flying increased. It did, but it also opened up a new market – affluent individuals and companies that didn’t want to commit to the then five-year contracts that fractional ownership entailed or didn’t anticipate needing 50 hours. It was easy. When you went through your 25 hours, you would call up and buy 25 more hours. There were no monthly management fees. When you flew, you paid.