Buying a jet card? Remember, there are options for cabin size or picking a specific aircraft type

Will any light jet do, or would it be better to have a specific type such as the Embraer Phenom 300?

While there are many variables that separate the over 300 jet cards in the Private Jet Card Comparisons database – over 65 in fact, one difference means a lot to some people and nothing to others.

However, for both types of buyers, choosing the wrong type of program can make for a less than enjoyable experience despite the provider’s overall merits. Figuring it out before you sign can both save you money and make sure the program fits your mission needs.

There are essentially two ways that available aircraft are structured for fixed-rate (and usually guaranteed availability) programs by jet card providers.

One is by cabin-class or size. When buying into a cabin class you are assured of getting an aircraft in that class or larger if you are lucky enough be upgraded based on operational needs.

The other is by specific aircraft make or type, for example, you are buying into an Embraer Phenom 300. So while the provider may let you fly in other types, you know when you want a Phenom 300, you’re going to get a Phenom 300 and not some other type of light jet.

Tradewind Aviation launches a Pilatus PC-12 jet card

The Goodspeed jet card is on its Pilatus PC-12 fleet with a service area covering the Northeastern U.S. and Caribbean

Tradewind Aviation, an operator of both private charter and by-the-seat semiprivate charter flights, is launching its first jet card program under the name Goodspeed across its fleet of 23 Pilatus PC-12 aircraft.

Targeting business travelers hopping from one meeting to the next and leisure travelers headed for vacation homes or weekend getaways, and families with children participating in traveling sports leagues, Goodspeed offers fixed-rate, one-way pricing so you don’t pay for repositioning flights.

PlaneSense expands its Pilatus PC-24 private jet fleet

PlaneSense Pilatus PC-24

The fractional operator sells shares on its Pilatus PC-12 and now expanding PC-24 fleet

While most people would probably know the nation’s two biggest fractional operators are NetJets and Flexjet, they might be hard-pressed to name number three. That would be New Hampshire-based PlaneSense. And while the two leaders battle it out with Gulfstream G650s and the Global Express, PlaneSense continues to pursue the short to mid-range flight market. Today it announced it has taken delivery of its third Pilatus PC-24, a twin-jet with a range of 2,000 nautical miles, and a takeoff distance of just 2,930 feet, including gravel and grass runways.

After two high-profile accidents, here are the safety issues that impact turboprop and piston charters and jet cards

King Air 350i PC-12

Recent private air crashes that killed soccer star Sala and one of Russia’s richest women are highlighting a number of safety issues

A world removed from those Gulfstream G650s and Bombardier Global Express private jets you read about in stories about what type of plane Jennifer Lopez or Elon Musk own are turboprops and piston aircraft. They’re also very popular.

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