Ex-Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria had previously sued fans who broke season ticket agreements and has a  trail of litigation

 

Jet card provider Private Jet Services (PJS) Group LLC is facing a lawsuit initiated by the Miami Marlins two weeks before the baseball club was sold, according to reports in the Miami Herald and Union Leader, a local New Hampshire publication where PJS is based. The company, which recently celebrated its 15th anniversary recently, specializes in private jet travel for live entertainment tours, political campaigns and sports teams. According to its website, its clients have won 113 Grammy Awards, 10 World Series Championships and 13 NHL Stanley Cups. 

 

The lawsuit, according to the published reports, says PJS provided “inferior charter service.” According to the Union Leader, “The $13 million-plus contract called for a dedicated concierge to handle scheduling and catering, which was to include china, linen, silver, glassware and a premium open bar — luxury digs that were well publicized after the deal was announced because the team was previously known for being extremely thrifty.”

 

The Marlins are now owned in part by baseball legend Derek Jeter, however, the team’s former owner Jeffrey Loria leaves a long trail of lawsuits during his tenure as proprietor, including multiple lawsuits against season ticket holders and tenants of its luxury boxes. He was also involved in litigation during a previous tenure as owner of the Montreal Expos.

 

Deadspin earlier this year wrote, “In January, the team won a judgment against (Kenneth) Sack for the full $97,200 (for breaking a multi-year season ticket contract), but his attorney appealed, arguing that he’d missed key hearings and filings after suffering a heart attack and spending months in the hospital…But in the meantime, the team has used that judgment to try to nab a building owned by Sack. On March 12, the Marlins initiated a foreclosure proceeding for a commercial building Sack owns in Oakland Park, arguing that they can seize the property (assessed at $725,000) to fulfill the $97,200 he owes the team; they ask the judge to appoint a receiver so they can start collecting rent from the location.”

 

PJS owner and CEO Greg Raiff declined to comment when contacted by Private Jet Card Comparisons. Raiff has been involved in group travel since his time at Middlebury College where he built a $7 million business moving 50,000 students for Spring Break. Among its long-standing sports team clients are the Boston Bruins. Raif has previously said PJS’s entry into jet cards was a natural evolution from the demanding world of large group charters, particularly political campaigns where flight plans change on a near hourly basis.

 

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About the Author Doug Gollan

I study and write about Ultra High Net Worth (UHNW) consumers, luxury travel, the business of luxury and private aviation, particularly jet cards